HIV-1 Infection Detection Assay for Seroconverted HIV-1 Vaccine Recipients

Available for licensing and commercial distribution is a serological test specifically designed to distinguish between antibodies generated in HIV vaccine recipients and those generated in a natural HIV infection. The method is useful in HIV vaccine development and clinical studies as it can readily detect early breakthrough infections in seroconverted vaccine recipients, thus providing the information required to determine vaccine efficacy. The test kit includes diagnostic peptide fragments derived from human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1).

Anti-Vaccinia Monoclonal Antibody

The current technology describes a monoclonal antibody that reacts with a vaccinia virus protein abundantly expressed under an early viral promoter after infection of cells. The antibody is useful for quantitating vaccinia virus infected cells and for studying the function of the protein to which it binds, which is known to be a double stranded RNA binding protein involved in resistance of the virus to interferons. This antibody is available for licensing through a biological materials license agreement.

Probe To Identify Enteroinvasive E. coli And Shigella Species

Standard means for detecting pathogenic organisms in food or clinical specimens rely on animals or large DNA fragments, such as the 17 kb EcoRI fragment of Boileau. These methods are expensive, time-consuming, difficult to use, and have not been able to distinguish between nonvirulent enteroinvasive E. coli and Shigella. This invention describes DNA probes for enteroinvasive E. coli and Shigella species, including the sequence of the 2.5 kb fragment (SmaII and Falkow's) on which the probe is based.

MVA Expressing Modified HIV envelope, gag, and pol Genes

This invention claims Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA), a replication-deficient strain of vaccinia virus, expressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) env, gag, and pol genes, where the genes are isolated from Ugandan Clade D isolates, Kenyan Clade A isolates, and Tanzanian Clade C isolates. In a rhesus macaque SHIV model, DNA priming followed by a recombinant MVA (rMVA) booster controlled a highly pathogenic immunodeficiency challenge. Both the DNA and the rMVA components of the vaccine expressed multiple immunodeficiency virus proteins.

Construction of Recombinant Baculoviruses Carrying the Gene Encoding the Major Capsid Protein, VP1, From Calicivirus Strains (Including Norovirus Strains Toronto, Hawaii, Desert Shield, Snow Mountain, and MD145-12)

The noroviruses (known as "Norwalk-like viruses") are associated with an estimated 23,000,000 cases of acute gastroenteritis in the United States each year. Norovirus illness often occurs in outbreaks, affecting large numbers of individuals, illustrated recently by well-publicized reports of gastroenteritis outbreaks on several recreational cruise ships and in settings such as hospitals and schools.

Construction of an Infectious Full-Length cDNA Clone of the Porcine Enteric Calicivirus RNA Genome

Porcine enteric calicivirus (PEC) is a member of the genus Sapovirus in the family Caliciviridae. This virus causes diarrheal illness in pigs, and is presently the only enteric calicivirus that can be grown in cell culture. In addition to its relevance to veterinary medicine as a diarrheal agent in pigs, PEC serves as an important model for the study of enteric caliciviruses that cause diarrhea and that cannot be grown in cell culture (including the noroviruses represented by Norwalk virus).

Enzymatically-Active RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase From a Human Norovirus (Calicivirus)

The noroviruses (formerly known as “Norwalk-like viruses”) are associated with gastroenteritis outbreaks, affecting large numbers of individuals each year. Emerging data are supporting their increasing recognition as important agents of diarrhea-related morbidity and mortality. The frequency with which noroviruses are associated with gastroenteritis as “food and water-borne pathogens” has led to the inclusion of caliciviruses as Category B Bioterrorism Agents/Diseases.

Full-Length cDNA Clone Representing the Consensus Sequence of the RNA Genome of a Human Norovirus (strain MD145-12) That Encodes Biologically Active Proteins

The invention provides for a full-length cloned cDNA copy of the RNA genome of a predominant norovirus strain (Genogroup II.4) designated MD145-12 that was associated with human gastrointestinal illness. The noroviruses, which were formerly known as "Norwalk-like" viruses are estimated to cause 23 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the USA each year. The virus has been designated into category B of the CDC biodefense-related priority pathogens because it can be used as an agent of bioterrorism.

HIV-Dependent Expression Vector

This invention provides a DNA construct that can be useful for both diagnostics and AIDS therapeutics. The construct can be incorporated into a retrovirus or into a cell line. This construct mediates the expression of a selected gene in the presence of HIV replication, but is silent in the absence of HIV. The cell line with the incorporated construct can be used as an indicator line for the presence of replication-competent HIV. The virus containing the construct can be used to co-infect a population of HIV-infected cells.

Vaccines Comprising Sand Fly Salivary Proteins for Control of Leishmania Infection

This invention relates to the use of several peptides from the salivary glands of various sand fly species for the control of leishmania infection. Many of these peptides were shown to be effective in eliciting potent immune responses in animal models and are excellent candidates for the development of vaccines against the disease. A vaccine comprising one of the peptides was used to protect mice challenged with parasites and salivary gland homogenates.